Browsing Category Psychology

Study finds kids raised by gay parents are just as healthy

Over the past few decades, many laws and advances have been made in the world of same sex couples.

Sperm banks were open for lesbian couples trying to conceive, adoption was legalized for gay couples wanting to be parents, and the option of surrogacy has become increasingly popular. Up until the 1980’s, the idea of gay parents having kids was unheard of. Now, it is quite common for same sex-couples to have a bundle of joy. An estimated 690,000 same-sex couples live in the United States, with about 19 percent of them raising children under age 18 . Taking into consideration such a large percentage, many were worried about the negative impacts of parenting outside the social norms we were used to (heterosexual couples).

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What do you mean you don’t enjoy sex?

One of the most misunderstood concepts of human sexuality is the avoidance of sex altogether, referred to as asexuality.

Asexuality is a sexual orientation in which people do not feel any sexual attraction toward others. (Even if they have had sex.) While this comes across as a choice that people make, the definition of asexuality and those who belong to the category is complex.

According to the Asexual Visibility and Education Network asexuality is described as an intrinsic part of a person’s identity, in comparison to the choice of being celibate. This suggests that asexuality is neither a choice nor a lifestyle, but rather a disposition. This does not mean that asexuality can be solely defined as averting sexual behavior from birth, as there are choices involved in being asexual.

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What could ADHD and workaholism possibly have to do with one another?

We’ve screwed up talking about ADHD.

It’s easy to attach your worth to your accomplishments, behaviors, and status. It makes sense, doesn’t it? That’s how we value everything. If something performs well, like an iPhone, then it’s worth a whopping $700. We tend to do that with people, too. If you see someone not “performing” well in their schooling, then it’s easy to label them as stupid, immature, or worthless. Adults and children with ADHD endure the pangs of unreachable standards everyday of their lives.

WE LIVE IN A SOCIETY THAT IS TERRIBLE AT ACCOMMODATING OR DISCUSSING MENTAL ISSUES.

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The Places You’ll (Pokemon) GO!

It’s a new school year, and you know what that means. A return to waking up earlier, and seeing all of those familiar faces you don’t always have the best luck engaging with socially. You’ve always felt like you were on the outside looking in when it came to the cliques. The ambitions you have of talking to that crush of yours in the front of class are all but lost on you as you struggle to think of what you may have in common. The bell is about to ring when you notice them reach for their bag and, wait, is that what you think it is? The light blue aura of the Pokemon GO! app emanating from their phone is unmistakable. Summoning some courage, you get the nerve to say hello and walk with them in the hallway, breaking the ice. You both discuss what you’ve caught so far, and make plans to have your own safari one day this week after class.

The short narrative above is a fictitious example of a potentially beneficial experience that could occur amongst introverted young adults. Since online gaming came about, people have been capable of remote social experiences, but this new mobile gaming trend may have the potential to bring people together like never before.

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Research finds that people with anorexia have distortions in spatial perception

Eating disorders are misunderstood.

They aren’t an intense diet or plan and they can take over a person’s life, mentally and physically. NAMI ( the National Alliance on Mental Illness) reports that around 1 in 20 people will be affected by an ED at some point in their lives.

Anorexia (AN) is a common eating disorder and it’s a condition where a person will literally starve themselves and over-exercise to lose weight. Because their goal is to get and stay thin by any means necessary. it’s a condition that is very extreme and incredibly motivated. Though not classified as an ED, body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a condition in which where a person will obsess over their physical appearance to a point of dysfunctionality.

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To conform or not to conform, that is the question

I have always listened to all genres of music: Rock, rap, show tunes, country—you name it. I never thought anything of it until one day in high school, when I was listening to some top 40 songs and a classmate of mine told me it was weird that I still listened to popular commercial music. I asked what she meant, and she said that she hadn’t listened to pop music in years because it was “too mainstream,” and that she was “really only into alternative music right now.” Don’t get me wrong; I love alternative music, too.

I just found it bizarre that she made a comment criticizing the fact that I was listening to a certain kind of music because it was too popular.

This was my first experience with the sort of fad that nonconformity had become. Since then, the concept of conforming versus not conforming has become a topic of discussion in the social sciences as well as in my everyday life.

Conformity is behavior in compliance with a set of socially accepted norms, or “rules.” In the realm of the social sciences, there are two types of conformity: normative conformity, in which the goal is to fit in with a group even though we might privately disagree with the views of the group, and informational conformity, in which we look to a group for guidance in times of uncertainty and accept the views of the group as our own.

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What if memories could be erased, while others created?

What if I told you the way you perceive memories was about to change drastically? The ability to remember varies for everyone. Some people’s memories may be fragmented, while others’ are quite vivid and rich with detail. How exactly could we change what our brains have already stored? And are memories not just the psychological residue of what once was? Isn’t what we remember something that is merely out of our control?

Where science is currently taking us in its research pertaining to memory and just how flexible our brains can be, will disturb some and fascinate others. How would you perceive a world in which it is possible to create memories without you even being a part of them?

Memory creation by cortical stimulation is real, tested, and possible.

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How microaggresions single people out

We all have uncomfortable moments in life.

It may involve realizing we had a stain on our shirt all day, or accidentally pushing on a ‘pull’ door but those moments hardly ever cross the line from embarrassing to painful. However, when those cases are pointedly aimed at a particular group, because of color or identity, the line is crossed regularly. A comment made ‘in good fun’ could in fact be disturbing to the one addressed. Such actions are called ‘microaggressions.’

Dr. Derald Sue, a professor of psychology and education, classifies microaggressions  as “the everyday slights, indignities, put-downs, and insults that people of color, women, LGBT populations, or those who are marginalized experience in their day-to-day interactions with people.”

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How sensory deprivation tanks can make you zen

Music blaring, phones buzzing, cars honking, computer screens shining, people talking, and talking..

Our daily lives are typically consumed with distracting sensory stimuli such as these.

Our brain is a powerfully complex organ that will absorb the surrounding sensory input and process it in an orderly fashion, but what if our brains were given a little break from all the sensory stress? What if we were given the opportunity to float in space like an astronaut and ponder the mysteries of the universe? How would depriving the brain of all senses affect physical and psychological functioning? Maybe the thought of this intrigues you, maybe it causes anxiety, but neurophysiologist, John Lily, found a way to remove all sensory input and create an illusion of floating in space.

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